Vampires coming to The Mark Twain House & Museum

VAMPIRES!

Featuring “The Tillinghast Nightmare” documentary
and Bram Stoker’s great-grandnephew Dacre Stoker

The Mark Twain House & Museum and Historic Haunts present VAMPIRES!, a spooky, fun-filled evening starting with The Tillinghast Nightmare, a documentary chronicling the transformation of the blood-thirsty vampire from vile, menacing neighbor in rural Eastern Europe to the beguiling, aristocratic stranger known as Dracula. The documentary also explores the Tillinghast family’s decision to exhume the body of their beloved daughter Sarah and burn her heart in 1799 Exeter, Rhode Island .

This thrilling documentary screening takes place on Wednesday, October 30th at 7:00 p.m. in the Mark Twain House Visitor’s Center.

The film will be followed by a conversation with author Dacre Stoker, the great grandnephew of Twain friend and Dracula author Bram Stoker. Mr. Stoker will be discussing his research on vampires, as well as his book Dracula – The Un-Dead.

Tickets are $15.00 and are available by calling (860) 280-3130.

ABOUT THE TILLINGHAST NIGHTMARE

According to legend, in 18th century Exeter, RI, Stutely Tillinghast dreamed that half his orchard was destroyed. Soon after, his daughter Sarah became sick and died. One by one, his children took ill and followed Sarah to the grave. To save the lives of those remaining, Tillinghast dug up the body of his beloved daughter Sarah, cut out her heart and burned it.

The Tillinghast Nightmare documentary explores the facts and folklore of vampire exorcism in New England in an effort to shed light on this gruesome practice. The documentary also explores the transformation of the vampire from diseased kin to the aristocratic Count Dracula.

Award-winning director Alec Asten is from Westerly, Rhode Island. The Tillinghast Nightmare documentary is his second in the Historical Haunts series. The documentary was filmed at various locations in Rhode Island, Connecticut and Massachusetts.

www.histhaunts.com

The Tillinghast Nightmare documentary is made possible in part by grants from the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities and the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts.

ABOUT STOKER ON STOKER
Dacre Stoker, great grandnephew of Dracula author, Bram Stoker will share the Stoker family perspective on mysteries behind the writing of Dracula, including the intriguing connection between Samuel Clemens and Bram Stoker, who were for a time, neighbors in London. Born worlds apart, Clemens and Stoker, shared a rapport built on humor, their similar life outlooks and common interests – spiritualism, as well as science and technology. The two borrowed material – one gentleman complimenting the other: a line from Following the Equator inserted into Dracula and for years, Bram’s story about a priest who jumped to conclusions was a part of Mark Twain’s lectures. Samuel Clemens and Abraham Stoker, writers who each made his indelible mark, interesting individuals and a fascinating friendship.

www.bramstokerestate.com

The Mark Twain House & Museum (www.marktwainhouse.org ) has restored the author’s Hartford, Connecticut, home, where the author and his family lived from 1874 to 1891. Twain wrote his most important works during the years he lived there, including Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court.

In addition to providing tours of Twain’s restored home, a National Historic Landmark, the institution offers activities and educational programs that illuminate Twain’s literary legacy and provide information about his life and times.

The house and museum at 351 Farmington Ave. are open Monday through Saturday, 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., and Sunday, noon-5:30 p.m. For more information, call 860-247-0998 or visit www.marktwainhouse.org.

Programs at The Mark Twain House & Museum are made possible in part by support from the Connecticut Department of Economic & Community Development, Office of the Arts, and the Greater Hartford Arts Council’s United Arts Campaign.  

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