New Hampshire Director in Search of Donations for Vampire Film


By Jason Harris


Writer and director Tim Morgan (author of The Trip), who lives in New Hampshire, has started a Kickstarter campaign to get his short film, My DreamGirl Was A Vampire, made. If he meets his goal, every backer who donates a $1 or more will receive a MP4 file of the movie.

Morgan’s impetus for My DreamGirl was a Vampire first developed in 1995 when he was working on a vampire movie that he wanted to direct as a feature, but didn’t have access to actors or the equipment.

“I wound up putting it down because the short was beyond what I could do with what I had access to at the time,” Morgan said.

In 1996, Morgan wrote a feature with a vampire named Stefanie as a “directed study in college,” he said.

“I had fun with it and it was the best I could do at the time, but it was a bad rip-off of The X-Files. There was something about Stefanie’s character that would stick with me, though, and I tried a couple times over the years to reboot her, but it never seemed to work.”

This past fall, Morgan wrote a new vampire short after meeting a couple of new actors who he had never worked with before.

“The early draft was darker and edgier but it just didn’t feel right. So I put that aside, thought about bringing Stefanie back, and wrote the script that became My DreamGirl Was A Vampire.”

The vampire, Stefanie, will be portrayed by New Hampshire actor Kimberley Miller. Miller considers Stefanie to be a “complex character.” It’s the real emotional challenge of the character that intrigued her, she said.

“She is a vampire, but with some very human characteristics. She wants a way out and is very vulnerable/desperate. She doesn’t want to be a vampire. A majority of vampire stories are about the turning and the power and blood lust,” Miller said.

Morgan said that he’s trying to put an original spin on the genre, but knows he has to adhere to certain things that the “rabid fans of the genre” would want.

“I love this story because it’s a simple/sweet story about a girl (who happens to be a vampire) who wants a second shot at life and the quirky cute guy who can help her. It is more about making Stefanie real and sympathetic to the audiences than focusing on the vampire piece,” Miller said.

The other character in My DreamGirl Was A Vampire is museum employee Grant portrayed by another New Hampshire actor, Billy Pomerleau, who is looking forward to bringing this role to life.

“[Grant] has a personality that, in my opinion makes him very likable. He’s a bit of an ‘everyman’ and I’ve always rooted for the reluctant hero types. Not to mention the opportunity to work opposite the devilishly beautiful Kimberley Miller. I mean, who could say no to that,” Pomerleau said.

There are 18 days left in Morgan’s campaign to raise $2,500. So far, the campaign has raised $97.

“If you’re looking for a fresh voice in the vampire genre, with a new approach, this is for you,” Morgan said.

Morgan hopes the campaign is successful so he can film, My DreamGirl Was A Vampire, and bring it to film festivals. The biggest festival is Shriekfest, which he was at in 2003 with one of his scripts, Morgan said.

Along with every donator receiving a MP4 file, there are other giveaways including PDF files of the script, DVDs of the finished film, links to a person’s website, t-shirts, mentions on the short film’s official page, and producer credits.

You can find and donate to his campaign on Kickstarter here.

Vampires coming to The Mark Twain House & Museum


Featuring “The Tillinghast Nightmare” documentary
and Bram Stoker’s great-grandnephew Dacre Stoker

The Mark Twain House & Museum and Historic Haunts present VAMPIRES!, a spooky, fun-filled evening starting with The Tillinghast Nightmare, a documentary chronicling the transformation of the blood-thirsty vampire from vile, menacing neighbor in rural Eastern Europe to the beguiling, aristocratic stranger known as Dracula. The documentary also explores the Tillinghast family’s decision to exhume the body of their beloved daughter Sarah and burn her heart in 1799 Exeter, Rhode Island .

This thrilling documentary screening takes place on Wednesday, October 30th at 7:00 p.m. in the Mark Twain House Visitor’s Center.

The film will be followed by a conversation with author Dacre Stoker, the great grandnephew of Twain friend and Dracula author Bram Stoker. Mr. Stoker will be discussing his research on vampires, as well as his book Dracula – The Un-Dead.

Tickets are $15.00 and are available by calling (860) 280-3130.


According to legend, in 18th century Exeter, RI, Stutely Tillinghast dreamed that half his orchard was destroyed. Soon after, his daughter Sarah became sick and died. One by one, his children took ill and followed Sarah to the grave. To save the lives of those remaining, Tillinghast dug up the body of his beloved daughter Sarah, cut out her heart and burned it.

The Tillinghast Nightmare documentary explores the facts and folklore of vampire exorcism in New England in an effort to shed light on this gruesome practice. The documentary also explores the transformation of the vampire from diseased kin to the aristocratic Count Dracula.

Award-winning director Alec Asten is from Westerly, Rhode Island. The Tillinghast Nightmare documentary is his second in the Historical Haunts series. The documentary was filmed at various locations in Rhode Island, Connecticut and Massachusetts.

The Tillinghast Nightmare documentary is made possible in part by grants from the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities and the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts.

Dacre Stoker, great grandnephew of Dracula author, Bram Stoker will share the Stoker family perspective on mysteries behind the writing of Dracula, including the intriguing connection between Samuel Clemens and Bram Stoker, who were for a time, neighbors in London. Born worlds apart, Clemens and Stoker, shared a rapport built on humor, their similar life outlooks and common interests – spiritualism, as well as science and technology. The two borrowed material – one gentleman complimenting the other: a line from Following the Equator inserted into Dracula and for years, Bram’s story about a priest who jumped to conclusions was a part of Mark Twain’s lectures. Samuel Clemens and Abraham Stoker, writers who each made his indelible mark, interesting individuals and a fascinating friendship.

The Mark Twain House & Museum ( ) has restored the author’s Hartford, Connecticut, home, where the author and his family lived from 1874 to 1891. Twain wrote his most important works during the years he lived there, including Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, and A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court.

In addition to providing tours of Twain’s restored home, a National Historic Landmark, the institution offers activities and educational programs that illuminate Twain’s literary legacy and provide information about his life and times.

The house and museum at 351 Farmington Ave. are open Monday through Saturday, 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., and Sunday, noon-5:30 p.m. For more information, call 860-247-0998 or visit

Programs at The Mark Twain House & Museum are made possible in part by support from the Connecticut Department of Economic & Community Development, Office of the Arts, and the Greater Hartford Arts Council’s United Arts Campaign.  

Authors and Design Converge at

Stanley Tremblay owns a business,, for authors who need a cover for their print book. All designs range from $300 to $800 or more, depending on what a writer needs. Tremblay has done book covers that wrap from the front to the back. He has also done a continuous image where he has melded multiple images together to create something that goes completely around the book.

If you don’t want to have a print book made, but an e-book instead, he can help you with that as well. Past and present clients include Steve Alten, NY Times bestselling author of the MEG series, Jeremy Robinson, bestselling author of SecondWorld and Island 731, and Steven Savile, international bestselling author of Silver.

Not only does he do covers for print books and e-books, he can also help authors build their websites. He partnered with Mindstir Media and The Novel Blog. He had a hand with building the website for Variance Publishing, Rick Chesler and Rick Jones. Other sites can be found at

Find the Axis is a full-service graphic design company geared toward book creation and layout. From book covers to e-book and print layout, to HTML websites, logos, business cards, bookmarks and more, Find the Axis works hard to bring top quality work and rapid response to every client, regardless of size.

Tremblay has helped authors and publishing houses in the past. Check out his website,, and contact him to see how he can help you. Keep up with his latest designs on Facebook.

Publishing Company at Rhode Island Arts and Crafts Festival this Memorial Day Weekend

Jim Dyer and his  independent publishing house, Fenham Publishing, will be at the Gaspee Days Arts and Crafts Festival in Warwick, Rhode Island, this weekend. It’s a three-day event, which runs from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday and from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Monday.

Stop by his table to speak with him and to find out about the books he has published.

Dyer, the grandson of author C.M. Eddy, Jr., got the idea about publishing his grandfather’s collections after going through his grandparent’s papers and manuscripts. He wanted to produce a cohesive collection of their works, he said.

According to a 1963 Providence Evening Bulletin article, Eddy knew and worked with Houdini and H.P. Lovecraft. He was one of Houdini’s ghost writers along with Lovecraft. This article also states that Eddy’s wife typed up Lovecraft’s manuscripts.

His grandmother had written quite a few essays and remembrances of H.P. Lovecraft throughout the years for various magazines, newspapers, fanzines and books, he said.

“Many people wanted her to give her personal memories and view of Lovecraft, as she knew him as a friend,” Dyer said.

Dyer’s publishing house is located in Narragansett.

For more information about the Gaspee Days Arts and Crafts Festival, click here or to find out more about Fenham Publishing, click here.

Here is another article about Dyer, click here.