TERROR CON 2017 HOSTS ‘HALLOWEEN’ REUNION

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Altered Reality Entertainment, owners of Rhode Island Comic Con, the Biggest Show in the Smallest State, celebrates the return of Terror Con with a Halloween Reunion.

Terror Con, which returns to the Rhode Island Convention Center after a two-season hiatus, welcomesMalcom McDowell, Tyler Mane, and Scout Taylor-Compton in celebration of the 10th anniversary of the 2007 remake of the original movie by Rob Zombie.

Throughout a career spanning over fifty years, McDowell is perhaps best known for the controversial roles of Alex DeLarge in Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange, the title character in Tinto Brass’ Caligula, and Mick Travis in Lindsay Anderson’s trilogy of if…., O Lucky Man! and Britannia Hospital. He is also known for his work in Cat People, Tank Girl, and The Artist. McDowell has had recurring roles in numerous television series such as Entourage, Heroes, and The Mentalist.

Tyler Mane is a former professional wrestler. As an actor, he is known for playing Sabretooth in X-Men and X-Men: The Official Game, Ajax in Troy, as well as Michael Myers in the remake of Halloween and its sequel, Halloween II. Scout Taylor-Compton has appeared in numerous television roles and feature films. In addition to her role as Laurie Strode in Halloween, her most notable role includes her role as Lita Ford in the film The Runaways.

Halloween is an American horror movie franchise that predominately focuses on the fictional character of Michael Myers who was committed to a sanitarium as a child for the murder of his older sister, Judith Myers. Fifteen years later, he escapes to stalk and kill the people of Haddonfield, Illinois while being chased by his former psychiatrist Dr. Sam Loomis. Michael’s killings occur on the holiday of Halloween, on which all the films primarily take place.

Terror Con, celebrating horror, paranormal, music, and wrestling, comes to the Rhode Island Convention Center on February 25th and 26th. Tickets are currently available through the event’s website, www.theterrorcon.com. Ticket prices range from $25 to $45. VIP packages are available for $99.99.

Pictures from Scare-A-Con New England

By Jason Harris

 

Scare-A-Con took place the first weekend of June at the MassMutual Center in Springfield, MA.

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Sean Whalen (The People Under the Stairs, Twister)

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Steve Marshall and Jill Whitlow (both star in Night of the Creeps)

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Author Stacey Longo.

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Ernie Hudson (Ghostbusters, Grace and Frankie)

Freddy Krueger enjoying a cocktail.

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Felissa Rose (Sleepaway Camp).

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Jordan Ladd (Death Proof, Club Dread).

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The Massachusetts Ghostbusters.

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Michael Myers.

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Tony Moran

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Adrienne Barbeau (Swamp Thing, The Fog)

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Tom Atkins (Night of the Creeps, The Fog).

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Jason Lively (Night of the Creeps).

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Joe Bob Briggs.

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Me with P.J. Soles (Halloween).

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Authors Matthew M. Bartlett and Tom Breen.

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Wrestler Greg the Hammer Valentine.

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The crew behind Fat Foot Films.

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James Lorenz and Patty Mullen (Frankenhooker).

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Butch Patrick (The Munsters).

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Glenn Hetrick.

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Ernie Hudson.

Pictures from Rock and Shock 2014

 

By Jason Harris

 

The 11th Annual Rock & Shock has come to an end. It was another great year with celebrities, authors, books, and fans.

Actor Jeffrey Combs (Re-Animator, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine)

Actor Jeffrey Combs (Re-Animator, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine)

Author Stacey Longo and publisher Jim Dyer at the Books & Boos/Fenham Publishing table.

Author Stacey Longo and publisher Jim Dyer at the Books & Boos/Fenham Publishing table.

Jake Busey (Starship Troopers, The Frighteners)

Jake Busey (Starship Troopers, The Frighteners)

Actor/Director Tom Savini.

Actor/Director Tom Savini (From Dusk Till Dawn, Night of the Living Dead).

Author Mike Aloisi.

Author Mike Aloisi.

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Actress Lynn Lowry ( The Crazies, Cat People)

Actress Lynn Lowry (The Crazies, Cat People).

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Derek Mears (Friday the 13th and Halloween remakes)

Derek Mears (Friday the 13th remake)

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Artist/Publisher Derek Rook of Rough House Publishing and model/actress Sarah Michelle.

Artist/Publisher Derek Rook of Rough House Publishing and model/actress Sarah Michelle.

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Author Dan Graffeo with his book, Halloween Night Fever.

Author Dan Graffeo with his book, Halloween Night Fever.

Actor John Ratzenberger (Cheers).

Actor John Ratzenberger (Cheers).

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Actor Brad Dourif (Child's Play).

Actor Brad Dourif (Child’s Play).

Author Stacey Longo and actress Fiona Dourif (Curse of Chucky)

Author Stacey Longo and actress Fiona Dourif (Curse of Chucky).

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Juno of Juno's Place.

Juno of Juno’s Place.

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WWE wrestler/actor Roddy Piper (They Live).

WWE wrestler/actor Roddy Piper (They Live).

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Actor Alex Vincent (Child's Play, Child's Play 2).

Actor Alex Vincent (Child’s Play, Child’s Play 2).

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William L. Bozarth and Laura D. James, authors of Spooky Skwerl Stories.

William L. Bozarth and Laura D. James, authors of Spooky Skwerl Stories.

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‘Saw’ Cuts Its Way Back into Theaters this Halloween to Celebrate 10th Anniversary

 

Horror Film Which Ignited Blockbuster Franchise Will Be Available in Theaters for One Week Only Starting October 31

 

This Halloween, Lionsgate will celebrate the 10th anniversary of the theatrical release of Saw, the film that kicked off the most successful horror franchise in history, by bringing it back to theaters nationwide for one week only.  The film will open on Friday, October 31st, with select screenings beginning Thursday night, October 30th.  The seven Saw films grossed $874 million at the box office worldwide and were hailed by the Guinness Book of World Records as the “Most Successful Horror Franchise” of all time.

“The launch of Saw was a signature event in Lionsgate’s history, establishing our first franchise and paving the way for our growth into a global studio,” said Lionsgate President of Acquisitions & Co-Productions Jason Constantine. “We are excited for our fans to revisit the twisted magic that first blew their minds on Halloween 2004.”

“As part of Saw’s 10th anniversary, we’re thrilled to give new fans and audiences the opportunity to experience this film on the big screen for the very first time,” added Saw’s producers Oren Koules and Mark Burg.

Saw was the first collaboration for co-creators James Wan, who directed the film, and Leigh Whannell, who wrote the screenplay. Together, they also created the successful Insidious franchise, and Wan has gone on to direct such high-profile films as The Conjuring and the upcoming Fast & Furious 7.

Directed by Wan from a script penned by Whannell, Saw is a psychological thriller focusing on two men who wake up in a secure lair of a serial killer, with a dead body lying between them. The killer, nicknamed “Jigsaw,” leaves them tape recorded messages with details of how to make it out alive. The only way for one man to make it out alive is to do the unthinkable. The two men desperately try to find a way out, while also trying to figure out who’s behind their kidnapping. The film, which was released over Halloween weekend on October 29, was produced by Gregg Hoffman, Oren Koules, and Mark Burg.

Rock and Shock Starts Promoting Its 11th Show

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Rock & Shock is getting ready to turn it up to 11! In anticipation of the 11th anniversary of the horror and music convention that brings 3 days of monsters, music and mayhem to downtown Worcester, MA, Rock & Shock is giving the public an extra early sneak peak at this year’s attendees. While there are still plenty of big name acts yet to be divulged, Rock & Shock is pleased to announce that among this year’s guests will be Brad Dourif, John Ratzenberger, Jeffrey Combs, Nivek Ogre and Fiona Dourif. Meanwhile, King Diamond, Machine Head and Twiztid are among some of the convention’s scheduled performers.

Brad Dourif, the voice of everyone’s favorite flame-haired doll turned serial killer Chucky will be making a rare convention appearance at Rock & Shock 2014. Dourif is a legendary character actor who is best known for his appearances in Rob Zombie’s Halloween 1 & 2, The Exorcist III, The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers & The Return of the King, Dune, TV’s Deadwood and his breakthrough role as Billy Bibbit in Milos Forman’s 1975 classic One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. To make the event a true family affair, Dourif will be joined by his real life daughter and True Blood star Fiona Dourif. Fiona’s other screen credits include Curse of Chucky, Deadwood and Paul Thomas Anderson’s Academy Award nominated film The Master.

He has danced with the stars, voiced some of your favorite cartoon characters and even fought for the Rebel Alliance and this October, Cheers‘ very own John Ratzenberger will be returning to the place where everybody knows his name. In addition to portraying Cliff Clavin, postal worker extraordinaire on the seminal Boston-based TV series Cheers, Ratzenberger has appeared in films such as Motel Hell and House 2: The Second Story, competed on Dancing With the Stars and has become the voice of Pixar. Ratzenberger is, in fact, the only actor to voice for a character in every Pixar film; most notably Hamm the Piggy Bank in the Toy Story series, The Abominable Snowman in Monsters, Inc. and Mack the Truck in the Cars.

A legend in both the horror and sci-fi communities, Jeffery Combs will be making his triumphant return to Rock & Shock this year. Combs first made his name as Herbert West, the main character in Re-Animator and it’s two subsequent sequels. He followed that up with appearances in several classic horror films including The Frighteners, I Still Know What You Did Last Summer, House on Haunted Hill, FeardotCom and most recently, Would You Rather. However, science-fiction fans will best know Combs for his portrayals of several characters within the Star Trek universe, most notably the Vorta clone Weyoun on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine.

Rounding out the early announcements is Skinny Puppy and ohGr frontman Nivek Ogre. Since forming Skinny Puppy in 1982, Ogre has wowed audiences as both a musician and an actor, appearing in films such as Repo! The Genetic Opera, 2001 Maniacs: Field of Screams and The Devil’s Carnival.

Speaking of world renowned musicians, this year’s performers are set to include: King Diamond, who will kick-off the event’s pre-party on Thursday, October 16, Machine Head, Children of Bodom, Epica and Battlecross, who will be rocking the Palladium stage on Friday, October 17 and Twiztid, back by popular demand with their Fright Fest festivities and scheduled to close out the event on Sunday, October 18. A very special guest headliner for Saturday is set to be announced in August, so let the speculation begin!

Tickets for Rock & Shock 2014 go on sale this Friday, June 27th at 10am and may be purchased at ticketfly.com, FYE stores or at the Palladium box office. There are still plenty of celebrity guests, musical acts and events yet to be announced so make sure to follow Rock & Shock on Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram and visitrockandshock.com.

Lew Temple Talks about ‘The Walking Dead,’ Rob Zombie, and Baseball

By Jason Harris

Lew Temple. photo by Jason Harris

Lew Temple. photo by Jason Harris

Lew Temple’s time on The Walking Dead has ended, but he’s still proud of the work he did on the series, even though he thinks his character Axel had more to do in the show.

“I was obviously disappointed,” Lew Temple said. “I thought he was going to be serviceable to the group.”

Temple was given the news three weeks in advance that his character was going to die. He was in denial at first, but after some time he had to commit to it, he said.

“My intent is to always serve the story and that was my job. I wanted to do the best job possible.”

Temple did feel “disappointed for Axel,” though. As an actor, he will go on and work, but Axel is gone forever, he said.

The character of Axel will live on in The Walking Dead comic books and in reruns.

Temple did use the comic book character of Axel as a blueprint. Since comic books are one-dimensional, he had to make the character three-dimensional.

“I’m certain that we were able to use some of Robert [Kirkman’s] characteristics of Axel, but also brought some of my own to it as well.”

The producers on the zombie series knew of Temple before he came on in season three since he had been in to see them for the pilot.

“They looked at me for the role of Merle, originally, and then after that they hired Michael Rooker. Then they needed Merle’s brother, Daryl, who at that time was not even named.”

Temple auditioned for Daryl by reading Merle’s lines differently, which he was asked to do by the producers.

“Thankfully, they hired Norman Reedus. So when Axel came around they came to me and we were able to make that work.”

Temple was aware of the popularity of The Walking Dead, but not of the cross-cultural phenomenon it has become.

“I would say it hasn’t hurt me,” Temple said about Hollywood recognizing him from the popular series. “I would say prior to The Walking Dead I had a certain body of work Hollywood was aware of, and I was working prior to The Walking Dead …”

He admits that the series has elevated his visibility, which has helped him. He doesn’t know if his time on the series has defined him, which only “time will tell.”

“I like to do diverse stuff. I’m certainly proud of the work I did on The Walking Dead and to be part of that show. It’s been such an incredible hit.”

Temple has worked with writer and director Rob Zombie on Halloween and The Devil’s Rejects. He has “a really great relationship beyond a working relationship” with Zombie.

“I adore working with him because he knows what he wants and wants what he knows so there’s not a lot of grey area in-between. He is an absolute perfectionist and he does whatever it takes to make the day work, and if that means he needs to provide something on set, he does so.”

He does expect to work with Zombie again because he thinks they work well together. He just doesn’t know when that will happen.

“I think that I bring something to his story that he appreciates. It wouldn’t be a surprise to see Lew Temple in a Rob Zombie production yet again.”

Along with acting, Temple is “an incredible baseball fan.” He adores the game and it has been his first passion since he was a little boy. He’s even played it all the way up until the minor leagues with the Seattle Mariners and Houston Astros. When he couldn’t play the game, he worked as a baseball scout for the New York Mets. Now he roots for the Atlanta Braves.

“I would say I’m excited for the Red Sox, but rooting for the [Detroit] Tigers.”

Temple also writes music.

“I think that I am a pretty interesting songwriter. I think that I am able to spin a tune, at least in my head.”

He has a record deal with Universal through the Rob Zombie production, Banjo and Sullivan.

Review: ‘The Lords of Salem’

Hello there, readers and writers of Horror, and watchers of horror movies. Well, watchers of movies in general. My name is Rob Smales, and this is my first ever movie review. Never even tried one before. Jason, the webmaster of the NEHW website, asked me for one, though, so I’m giving it a shot. If it sucks, don’t blame me, blame him.

Or better yet, blame Rob Zombie.

This is a review of Zombie’s new movie The Lords of Salem, from Alliance Films. Before I go off on  a rant here, I should probably tell you what kind of Horror movies I like — if  you don’t agree with my taste then you probably won’t agree with my review and can stop reading right now.Lords of Salem

Ready?

Friday the 13th (original, great!), Halloween (original, brilliant!), A Nightmare on Elm Street (original, I had to buy new pants!), Let the Right One In (the Swedish version, wonderfully creepy, fantastic idea!), The Woman in Black (Slow suspenseful build to get you looking over your shoulder — and THEN it gets scary!), The Ring (Still freaks me out), The Shining, The Birds, Psycho (the original), and the list goes on …

So, as you can probably see I like a touch of psychological horror over the Spatterfest. I also live in  Salem, Massachusetts, which is the setting for Zombie’s movie. A horror movie set in Salem? Should be a win-win for me, right?

Oh, one final thing. This review is going to contain spoilers, basically because I don’t know how to do it  without them. In fact, it’s going to be one big spoiler because I can tell you  in a couple of paragraphs what it took Rob Zombie one hour and forty-one minutes to tell me. Those who want to go out and experience the genius that is Rob Zombie first-hand, with no warnings or foreknowledge, there’s the door; we’ll catch you in the flip side. But hold on to the review — you can always watch the movie first, then come back and read the review later.

Alright, where to start …

This is the story of a nice little heroin addicted rock-n-roll DJ (played by Sheri Moon Zombie — wait, the  writer/director cast his wife in the starring role? Whew, no red flags here!) who works the night shift. One day she receives a box at the station containing  an unsolicited record with no title, just a note saying it is a gift from ‘The Lords’. She plays the record, the music doing something strange and mystical to  her and starting her down the path to possession by the Dark Lord Satan. Without her knowledge, of course. She’s guided on this path, again without her knowledge, by the spirit of a witch who was burned in Salem way back in the 1600s. She and her partners at the station play the record on the air where  (surprise, surprise) it’s a hit even though it sounds a bit like blocked pipes.  In a bull moose. Who has cramps. Once The Lords have a hit on their hands they  send another box to the station, this one containing free tickets, records and  posters so the station can host a local show for The Lords, which they do, even  though they have no contract and have never talked to, nor even seen, The Lords … because that’s just how things are done in the real world, right?

Anyway, the concert begins,  the music somehow being performed by the coven of witches that burned alongside  the witch who has been haunting Heidi, our leading lady. The coven has  apparently been summoned by Heidi’s landlady and two women she claims are her  sisters. The whole thing culminates in Heidi giving birth to a … uh .. a thing that looks a  bit like a Jumbo Shrimp that’s gotten into former Governator Schwarzenegger’s steroid stash.

Okay. Pros:

Though the film starts off somewhat cheesy, with a prologue set in the 1600s filled with naked dancing  witches, it slips almost effortlessly into modern day Salem and a naked DJ. As a  Salem native it was kind of neat to see things and places that I pass by on a daily basis in the film, and I have to admit the acting was not terrible. Okay, not too terrible.

The middle of the story, the haunting portion of our program, was actually pretty good. There was some nice camera work, a terrific dose of creepiness, a good build-up of suspense,  and even a couple of little “boo” moments where there were audible gasps from the audience.

Here, I thought, he saved it! All he has to do is build things in this vein and he might be able to make an impressive recovery!

Cons:

The last third of the film. Seriously, after making this creepy comeback within the movie you are somewhat unprepared when Zombie drives the plot right off the rails into an almost violent shift from scary and serious to something so over-the-top it actually becomes funny. Rather than trying to make any sense of what happens, I’ll simply list off some of what I consider the low points of the film, most of which happen in the later third of the action

  • The name of the film, The Lords of Salem.

The witches in the film were named “The Lords” way back in colonial Salem by the man who was trying to root them out … because it is only natural that someone would have referred to a group of women by such a masculine name, what with the Puritains being so open and fun-loving about things like gender.

  • Thanksgiving Day Satan.

When I think of Satan, The Father of Lies, The Prince of Darkness, the fallen Angel the Hebrews named “the Enemy,” I don’t think I have ever, ever, thought of a four-foot tall, succulent, crispy-skinned, juicy, cooked turkey with a vaguely human head. Apparently Rob Zombie does. I’m sorry, Mr. Zombie, no disrespect intended, but do you honestly think the Lord of All Evil should make the audience suddenly crave mashed potatoes and cranberry sauce? What was undoubtedly supposed to be a terrifying set of scenes really only made me hungry … and aware that it’s seven months ‘til Thanksgiving. Thanks. Thanks a lot … but, damn it, that Satan looked tasty!

  • Demonic Clergy masturbating day-glow strap-ons.

Okay …   this is a weird one. Faceless people strike me as creepy right off the bat —  the Terrible Trivium from “The Phantom Tollbooth” gave me nightmares as a kid. Faceless clergy in Hell … yes, creepy, and potentially scary depending on what they’re doing. This started out as a good idea, I think, but when what you have them doing is sitting in a group and facelessly beating the bishop (har-har) and the weasels they’re whipping happen to be somewhat floppy rubber penises in all the colors of the day-glow rainbow, well then what you get is an entire theater full of people all bursting out in laughter at the same time. That’s what you get, trust me. I was there and that’s what we did. Hell, I’m chuckling right now just thinking about it.

  • Where was the destruction of the World/Salem/Whatever at the end of the flick?

After all the threatening and posturing, after going through what was supposedly a terrible ordeal (aside from Turkey Satan and the Attack of the Day-Glow Dildos, of course) … nothing happens. There is no fire, there is no brimstone, there is  no destruction. Even Heidi seems to be happy at the end, suggesting the existence of some sort of Rohypnol of Evil. I want my destruction!

  • Naked women.

I  know, when was the last time you heard a guy complain about women taking their clothes off, right? Well, for me it was last Wednesday while I was watching this movie. When the DJ sleeps, she’s naked. Whenever there is  witchcraft they get naked. The ghost haunting the DJ is naked. The women who   hear the constipated moose music get naked. According to this movie every woman in Salem is just naked, naked, naked. I grew up here in Salem. I was a teen-ager in Salem. If there was some odd community of women who would just peel off whenever they heard a drum-beat then I’m pretty sure teenaged me, also known as The Human Hormone, would have found them and developed a one-man-band act so good it would have kicked the ass right off anything you see on American Idol today! All in all, it was more than a bit much. When,   toward the end of the movie, a group of women start shedding clothes and the 20-ish guy a couple of seats down from me shouts “Oh, come on!,” then Mr. Zombie, my friend, you’re doing it wrong.

Overall  Opinion:

The thing that annoys me about this film is that the middle portion is so comparatively good. It’s not  great, but it’s really pretty good. It’s like Rob Zombie was just showing us he could do it so we’d be more disappointed when he didn’t. What he did instead was make a film that’s going to be different things to different people.

If you’re a serious Horror movie buff who isn’t happy unless you’re having the pants scared off you, you might want to give this one a pass. The laughter at the end will only annoy you.

If you like the gore-fest,  then a lot of this movie will seem slow to you. There are a couple of nasty  scenes (it’s like Rob Zombie just couldn’t help himself) that try to make it up to you, but it probably won’t really be enough.

If you like the suspenseful  thriller, then this is almost for you… but winds up  being more of a tease than anything else. You’ll walk out of the theater bemoaning all that the film could have been.

If, however, you’re someone who occasionally likes to watch a movie just to make fun of it, as I sometimes  do, then we have your Golden Ticket right here.

There. My first movie review. Did you actually read this far? Did you laugh at the stuff up there? If you did, then this movie might be for you.

Okay. I’m going to go read up on how to actually write a movie review and see just how far from the norm I got with this one.

Until next time.

My Trip to Haddonfield

My Trip to Haddonfield

By Rob Watts

As a fan of many classic movies, I’ve had the pleasure of visiting a great deal of filming locations to those films. As a child I got to swim at the beach from Jaws in Martha’s Vineyard. I had the pleasure of visiting The Amityville Horror house in Toms River, New Jersey. Heck, I live within ten minutes of various movie locations in Boston where such films as The Town, The Departed, and Good Will Hunting were filmed. My absolute favorite location visited however was South Pasadena, California where the majority of John Carpenter’s HALLOWEEN was filmed.

Rob Watts in front of The Wallace home where Laurie’s friend babysat. Photo by Shannon Watts.

Unlike a lot of filming locations, the neighborhood of South Pasadena was used primarily “as is.” There was very little film trickery involved as the town of “Haddonfield” had (has) a charm and beauty of its own that needed very little set dressing. Aside from bags of painted leaves being thrown around within frame to establish autumn in Illinois, very little else was manipulated. Upon first visit to the now iconic neighborhood, I was shocked to see just how much of it resembled that as it was in the film, even more than thirty years later.

The hardware store (as it is today). Photo by Shannon Watts.

You don’t have to travel far around town to see most of the locations either, as much of the daytime hours scenes were all filmed within streets of each other. For instance, the street where Laurie Strode is walking to school after dropping the keys off at the Myers house (Meridian Ave), leads directly to the hardware store that was broken into later in the day. Incidentally, the actual Myers house was moved and restored directly across the street from the hardware store (now a picture framing store) and is currently a doctor’s office located at 1000 Mission Street.

Rob Watts on the steps of the Myers House. Photo by Shannon Watts.

If you walk back down Meridian Ave., you will be walking in the direction of the streets where Laurie and her friends walked home from school. You’ll want to look for Magnolia Street, Montrose Ave., and Highland Street. These are the streets which were most visible throughout the first half of the movie. Probably the most iconic location from the film, and believe me it’s still there, is the famous hedge where Michael Myers hid behind as the girls approached him. It’s a little tricky to find at first because most houses on the street have similar hedges, but if you travel down Montrose Ave, going through Oxley Street, you will stumble upon the giant hedge. Just make sure no one is standing behind it waiting for you.

The babysitting scene street . N Orange Grove Ave
The babysitting scene street. N Orange Grove Ave. Photo by Shannon Watts.

The last half of the film, where the girls were babysitting, was oddly enough filmed on the corner of Sunset Blvd in West Hollywood. Although you’d never know it from watching the film, directly behind the camera crew was a bustling nightlife. It was a bit odd for me to look in the opposite direction of the street from the film and find a KFC and Blockbuster Video (because I’m sure Laurie Strode could have run in there for help if she really needed it.) But that was the genius of John Carpenter. He had a knack for taking a side street of Los Angeles’ most happening neighborhood and have it appear as a modest suburban town in the middle of America.

The street where Myers drove behind the girls. Photo by Shannon Watts.

The two houses where Jamie Lee Curtis’ character and her friend babysat are located at 1530 and 1537 North Orange Grove Street, off Sunset Blvd. The home where Laurie Strode babysat looks almost identical as it did in the movie. The house across the street has been updated a great deal over the years but still maintains some resemblance to how it did in the movie.

Rob Watts in front of the Doyle House (Jamie Lee’s). Photo by Shannon Watts.

So if you are ever in the West Hollywood or South Pasadena area of California and you love the original Halloweenthen it’s worth a venture around the filming locations of this incredible film. Just be respectful to the homeowners and respect their privacy. And for God sake, if you see a guy walking around in a rubber mask, RUN!

The creepy staircase in the Myers house. Photo by Shannon Watts.

Actor Talks about the role of Michael Myers in the Original ‘Halloween’

Actor Talks about the role of Michael Myers in the Original Halloween

By Jason Harris

Actor Tony Moran portrayed the 23-year-old Michael Myers in the original Halloween (1978).

He had a great time on the movie and compares John Carpenter to a computer because of the way he had every shot planned out.

“We never shot more than three shots for every scene,” Moran said. “He was pretty amazing.”

He considers Jamie Lee Curtis, his Halloween co-star, “really cool and really good.”

“[She] was a down to Earth chick.”

When asked if there were any scenes filmed that didn’t make it into the movie, Moran didn’t know of any.

Moran was asked to be in the sequel, but turned it down.

“I didn’t want to wear a mask,” Moran said about his reason for turning down the sequel.

The mask was uncomfortable and “really hot,” he said.

“You couldn’t breathe through it. The only holes through it were for the eyes.”

When asked how long he was in the mask on a typical day, he replied. “It seemed like forever.”

Moran received credit in the sequel since footage from the original was used in it, he said.

He doesn’t plan on seeing Rob Zombie’s Halloween remake.

“It’s a remake of me so I won’t watch it.”

Moran is proud to have portrayed the character of Michael Myers

Tony Moran

and wouldn’t want to be known for Freddy Krueger or Jason Voorhees, two other horror icons from Nightmare on Elm Street and Friday the 13th fame, respectively. He states “Halloween started it all …”

Moran has added producer to his resume when he took on that job when a guy messaged him on Myspace and sent him a script for Beg, a short film. It’s now a full-length movie starring his friend Tony Todd, P.J. Soles, and Michael Berryman, who he got to be in the movie. Debbie Rochon is also in Beg.

He would love to work with director Martin Scorsese and actor Robert De Niro.

“They are brilliant.”

Moran will be appearing at The Nightmare Factory, located at 2 Museum Place Mall in Salem, MA. from Friday through Sunday.