Pictures from Rock and Shock 2015: Part II

By Jason Harris

 

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Actor John Amplas (Creepshow).

Actor John Amplas (Creepshow).

Actor Sherman Howard (Day of the Dead).

Actor Sherman Howard (Day of the Dead).

Lydia Deetz and Betelgeuse.

Lydia Deetz and Betelgeuse.

Actress Erika Ervin (American Horror Story).

Actress Erika Ervin (American Horror Story).

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Authors Adam Cesare (right) and Matt Serafini (left).

Authors Adam Cesare (right) and Matt Serafini (left).

Actress Felissa Rose (Sleepaway Camp).

Actress Felissa Rose (Sleepaway Camp).

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Actor Bill Moseley (The Devil's Rejects).

Actor Bill Moseley (The Devil’s Rejects).

Actor Bill Johnson (The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2).

Actor Bill Johnson (The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2).

Lou C. Fher a.k.a. the Devil.

Lou C. Fher a.k.a. the Devil.

Actor William Sanderson (True Blood).

Actor William Sanderson (True Blood).

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Actress Naomi Grossman (American Horror Story).

Actress Naomi Grossman (American Horror Story).

Authors on the Writer's Studio panel (from left to right): Joe Knetter, Stacey Longo, K.H. Vaugn and Jack Ketchum.

Authors on the Writer’s Studio panel (from left to right): Joe Knetter, Stacey Longo, K.H. Vaugn and Jack Ketchum.

Actor Tobin Bell (Saw).

Actor Tobin Bell (Saw).

Jim Dyer of Fenham Publishing.

Jim Dyer of Fenham Publishing.

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Actree/model Sarah Michelle (left) and a convention-goer.

Actress/model Sarah Michelle (left) and a convention-goer.

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Author Rob Smales holding the new anthology Insanity Tales II from Books & Boos' Press, which contains two of his stories.

Author Rob Smales holding the new anthology, Insanity Tales II from Books & Boos’ Press.

Smales has two stories in Insanity Tales II: The Sense of Fear.

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Pictures from Rock and Shock 2015

By Jason Harris

 

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Rock & Shock

Actress Samantha Mathis.

Actress Samantha Mathis.

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The Cast of The Monster Squad.

Actor

Actor Duncan Regehr (“Dracula”).

Actor Stephen M

Actor Stephen Macht (“Del”).

("The Mummy")

Actor Michael Reid MacKay (“The Mummy”).

Author Stacey Longo.

Author Stacey Longo.

The American Horror Story panel with Erika Ervin and Naomi Grossman.

The American Horror Story panel with Erika Ervin and Naomi Grossman.

Beetlejuice cosplay.

Beetlejuice cosplay.

Writer and director George Romero.

Writer and director George Romero.

Actress Rachel True (The Craft).

Actress Rachel True (The Craft).

John Kassir, the voice of the Cryptkeeper.

John Kassir, the voice of the Cryptkeeper.

Elvira and friend.

Elvira and friend.

Actress Sarah French and author Joe Knetter.

Actress Sarah French and author Joe Knetter.

Actress P.J. Soles (Halloween).

Actress P.J. Soles (Halloween).

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Actor Robert Mukes (House of 1000 Corpses).

Actor Robert Mukes (House of 1000 Corpses).

Actor Dan Yeager (Texas Chainsaw 3D).

Actor Dan Yeager (Texas Chainsaw 3D).

Author Jack

Author Jack Ketchum.

There will be a second post with pictures from Rock & Shock 2015 coming in a few days.

Looking Forward to Rock and Shock

By Jason Harris

 

Rock & Shock begins this coming Friday. I have always enjoyed going to and taking pictures at conventions. This year I’m looking forward to seeing authors Jack Ketchum, Joe Knetter, and Stacey Longo again. They have all attended the convention in the past.

The celebrity, who hasn’t been to Rock & Shock in the past and the one I’m looking forward, is Samantha Mathis. I have been a fan since her first movie, Pump Up the Volume2015-10-11 21.00.05
Lately, Mathis can be seen on the television series The Strain or the now canceled Under the Dome. You can find out about the other celebrities and events happening at Rock & Shock here.

Pictures from Rock and Shock 2013

By Jason Harris

Another Rock & Shock has come and gone, the 10th one to be exact. It was another good one with even more vendors this year. The one thing that was lacking was attendees in costume. There just wasn’t a lot of people in costume. Here are pictures from the event.

Lew Temple from The Walking Dead.

Lew Temple from The Walking Dead.

From right to left: authors Robert Duperre, Kurt Newton, and Stacey Longo at the Sideshow Press and Shock Totem tables.

From right to left: authors Robert Duperre, Kurt Newton, and Stacey Longo at the Sideshow Press and Shock Totem tables.

Dark Man and Elvira.

Dark Man and Elvira.

Robert Patrick from Terminator 2: Judgement Day.

Robert Patrick from Terminator 2: Judgement Day.

Author Joe Knetter at the Writer's Studio panel.

Author Joe Knetter at the Writer’s Studio panel.

The Morbid Vision Films table.

The Morbid Vision Films table.

Sharknado director Andrew C. Ferrante.

Sharknado director Andrew C. Ferrante.

Actor Joey Kern (Cabin Fever).

Actor Joey Kern (Cabin Fever).

Musician and actor Dee Snider.

Musician and actor Dee Snider.

Author K. Allen Wood and artist Jessie Young behind the Shock Totem table.

Author K. Allen Wood and artist Jessie Young behind the Shock Totem table.

Actor Jason Mewes.

Actor Jason Mewes (Clerks).

Items on the Morbid Vision Films table.

Items on the Morbid Vision Films table.

TL Smokeshop.

TL Smokeshop.

Jennifer Jostyn (The Brothers McMullen).

Jennifer Jostyn (The Brothers McMullen).

Actor Michael Rooker (The Walking Dead) with two fans.

Actor Michael Rooker (The Walking Dead) with two fans.

Author Gordon Bean holding his book, Dawn of Broken Glass, at the New England Horror Writers booth.

Author Gordon Bean holding his book, Dawn of Broken Glass, at the New England Horror Writers booth.

Authors Scott Goudsward, Joe Knetter, Jack Ketchum, Jack Haringa, and Bracken MacLeod on the Writer's Studio panel.

Authors Scott Goudsward, Joe Knetter, Jack Ketchum, Jack Haringa, and Bracken MacLeod on the Writer’s Studio panel.

Actor Jordan Ladd (Cabin Fever).

Actor Jordan Ladd (Cabin Fever).

Actors Gunnar Hanson, Tony Moran, Robert Englund, and Kane Hodder on the 40 Years of Our Worst Nightmares panel.

Actors Gunnar Hanson, Tony Moran, Robert Englund, and Kane Hodder on the 40 Years of Our Worst Nightmares panel.

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Actor Brian O'Halloran (Clerks 2).

Actor Brian O’Halloran (Clerks 2).

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Items on the TL Smokeshop table.

Items on the TL Smokeshop table.

Books on the Sideshow Press table.

Books on the Sideshow Press table.

More Book Vendors at 10th Rock and Shock

by Jason Harris

 

The 10th anniversary of Rock & Shock seems to have been the year for booksellers having a presence at the convention. In previous years, there were only Shock Totem, Sideshow Press, and the New England Horror Writers at the event.  Only the NEHW has been consistently representing its members there year after year for more than five years.

This year saw the NEHW joined by the returning representatives of Sideshow Press and Shock Totem, who both haven’t been at the convention in a couple years. The new booksellers at the event were Fenham Publishing and Living Dead Press. Click here to read a previous article on Fenham Publishing. There were also two authors, Jack Ketchum and Joe Knetter, in the celebrity area of Rock and Shock selling their books.

The New England Horror Writers (NEHW). Photo by Jason Harris.

The New England Horror Writers (NEHW). Photo by Jason Harris.

Sideshow Press

Sideshow Press. Photo by Jason Harris.

Shock Totem

Shock Totem. Photo by Jason Harris.

Living Dead Press. Photo by Jason Harris

Living Dead Press. Photo by Jason Harris.

Fenham Publishing. Photo by Jason Harris

Fenham Publishing. Photo by Jason Harris.

Jack Ketchum. Photo by Jason Harris.

Author Jack Ketchum. Photo by Jason Harris.

Author Joe Knetter. Photo by Jason Harris.

Author Joe Knetter. Photo by Jason Harris.

 

A Newbie Shares His Experiences of NECON 33

by Nicholas Conley

 

NEHW member Nicholas Conley holding his book, "The Cage Legacy."

NEHW member Nicholas Conley holding his book, “The Cage Legacy.” Photo by Jason Harris.

For writers, the process of actually writing a book is one of the most painfully brutal tasks imaginable.  It’s a meticulous, painstaking, heart-stopping (and often heartbreaking) procedure that truly changes a person.

See, once the plucky creative-minded person decides that he or she has aspirations to become (of all the things in the world) a writer … and once that foolish, foolish person decides to embark on the god-awful,  painful task of writing a book, well … that creative person quickly becomes wrapped up in his or her own world.  And inside that world, it often seems like the only thing you’re working toward is that last page, that final period.

Once you finish the book, you’ll be done, right?   The world will just end, won’t it?  Everything will be complete! Your life is finished!

No, not quite.

As it turns out, completing your book isn’t the end of the story.  No, not by a long shot.  Now that your work is out there – now that this collection of inner demons that you’ve been carrying around in your head is finally out in the world, and it’s available for people to read — now, it’s time to get YOURSELF out there.  It’s time to meet people, form new friendships and make new connections.  You’ve done the introverted part, and you did it well — but now, it’s time to gather up your extroverted energies and, uh … mingle.

But … mingling?  How are a bunch of socially awkward WRITERS suppose to MINGLE?

See, this is why going to fiction/horror/comic etc. conventions can be difficult, but it’s also why the good conventions are so much fun.  Conventions force all of us introverted writers, artists and other creative types to get to know each other and interact.  Above all else, these conventions force us to get out of our writing shells.

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Photo by N. Conley.

This is also why NECON (short for the Northeastern Writers Conference) is by far the most entertaining, lively and just plain entertaining convention I’ve ever had the opportunity to attend. Yes, it certainly features a smorgasbord of genre authors, artists and publishers, as well as plenty of enthusiastic genre fiction fans. But what makes NECON unique is that, really, it’s a surprisingly small, personal con; within a few hours, it’s as if you’ve known everyone there for years.

At NECON, the walls are down. It’s a highly casual affair, wherein all the big names (for example: Jack Ketchum, F. Paul Wilson, Kealan Patrick Burke, Christopher Golden, Brian Keene, etc.), small names and middling names are all on equal ground, and everyone freely interacts with one another. Everybody shares beers, trades corny jokes and gets to discuss their passions. Throughout my NECON experience, if there was one thing I heard quoted over and over again, it was this:

“Necon isn’t just a con, it’s a family.”

Yes, that’s definitely the feeling that one gets from attending. It doesn’t feel like a conference at all. Really, it just feels like a family reunion – the good kind, the kind where everyone cheerfully pokes fun at each other and catches up on what they’ve been doing for the last year.

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Photo by N. Conley.

For genre writers, the Northeastern Writers Conference in Rhode Island is something you hear a lot about, and always in highly enthusiastic tones. Put on every year by the Booth family, including founder Bob Booth (who is affectionately referred to as Papa Necon). Booth is a truly inspirational figure; currently battling lung cancer. Bob and his family’s perseverance is absolutely amazing to see.

NECON is the Booth family’s baby, and what a creation it is; most people I’ve spoken to refer to NECON as “the best con,” or “the only con I go to every year,” and now that I’ve attended, I can definitely understand why.

(Before we move on, allow me to insert an embarrassing side note and a tip: Yes, NECON is pronounced Knee-Con, not En-E-Con, Neck-on and definitely not Neeh-Cone. This seems obvious, but I’ll admit I actually made sure not to say Knee-Con out loud until I’d heard someone else say it first. Oh, the shame, the shame…)

Now, how did my weekend get started?

Okay, so I made the two-hour drive down from New Hampshire on Thursday afternoon. Immediately upon opening the doors, the welcoming nature of the whole event was made extraordinarily apparent. Once I got my badge, collected my bearings and started emptying all the empty candy/chips/highly-stereotypical-road-snack wrappers out of my bag, I was immediately greeted by Mark Angevine and artist Duncan Eagleson, both of whom did a terrific job at explaining everything, telling me the history of Camp Necon and showing me around. Seriously, I really can’t emphasize enough how great these guys were; I enjoyed many intriguing conversations with both of them throughout the weekend. From there, Mark offered me a cup of coffee – very, very strong coffee. I got the pleasure of enjoying a brief demonstration of his talented musical abilities, in particular his undeniable skill at playing the shakuhachi, an ancient Japanese end-blown flute.

From there, I met up with Scott Goudsward of the New England Horror Writers, a great guy who really does an admirable job at organizing all of these group events. There was a whole slew of NEHW members all over NECON, so all of us got to freely navigate throughout the convention. Sometimes at the table, sometimes at the panels or sometimes just walking around, you could always spot an NEHW member somewhere. Among those in attendance were Charles Day (The Legend of the Pumpkin Thief), Bracken McLeod (Mountain Home), Tracy L. Carbone (Restitution), David Price (Dead in the USA), Kristi Petersen Schoonover (Bad Apple), Michael Arruda (In the Spooklight), Eric Dimbleby (The Klinik) and Scott and Trisha Wooldrige (UnCONventional), as well as Jason Harris and Stacey Longo Harris, owners of the horror-themed Connecticut bookstore Books and Boos, which I’ll be doing a reading at on August 24.

Now, NECON is a four-day event , so naturally, there’s an enormous amount of great moments to talk about. However, since I’m far too aware of my own tendency to turn every article into a novel-length work (yes, I’m one of those guys, ugh), I’m going to force myself to whittle this down into a neat, tidy, manageable length. To accomplish this daunting task, I’m going to write out a concise list of highlights:

Rick Hautala

Rick Hautala

1. The Rick Hautala memorial.  Rick, who was famously known as “Maine’s other horror writer,”  was the author of over 30 novels and short stories; his recent death this past March was an enormous shock to many in the literary community. As a regular attendee of NECON – an event that was, according to his close friends, “Rick’s Christmas,” – most of the first night of NECON 33 was devoted to a moving tribute of the man and his work. Touching speeches were given by many of Rick’s friends and loved ones, including Christopher Golden and Rick’s wife, Holly Newstein Hautala. I’m sorry to say that I only had the opportunity to meet Rick once, back at Anthocon 2012. However, even in my limited interactions with him, Rick’s kindness and generosity were truly remarkable, especially for someone who so many young horror writers (myself included!) have looked up to for so many years; he was truly one of a kind. Rest in peace, Rick.

2. For the next highlight, going back to speeches; I can’t go without mentioning that every speech given by Mike Myers and Rio Youers was absolutely gut-bustingly hilarious. Great job, guys.

3. The Hawaiian shirt contest! Ridiculous as it might sound, this was totally one of my most anticipated events of the weekend. Since I consider myself to be something of a Hawaiian shirt connoisseur (and with that, the crowd groans), I was excited to give this a whirl. As it was, my shirt – a white and red number – placed in third, winning me a set of googly eyes. I was happy with third place, since my fellow top fivers (including the winner, Barry Dejasu) had some really terrific shirts. My personal favorite was probably Errick Nunnally’s Spider-Man number, which displayed almost all of the major Amazing Spider-Man issues of the last fifty years.

4. “That Damn Game Show,” hosted by Craig Shaw Gardner and Doug Winter. This is the sort of event that could only happen at NECON; a relentlessly silly “game show” with a head-smacking number of “simple rules.” Truly, an enormous amount of fun.

5. The artists’ reception – complete with coffee! – where everyone got to chance to spend some time exploring all of the amazing art pieces at the show, and discussing them with the artists themselves. Artists in attendance included Jill Bauman, Caniglia, Stephen Gervais and the aforementioned Duncan Eagleson. Overall, I probably spent the most time speaking with him. Duncan is an exceptionally interesting guy with a lot of great insights, as well as being a truly remarkable artistic talent; his Lovecraftian “Homo Avis” piece was absolutely fascinating.

6. …and finally, the courtyard! Why the courtyard? Because when it comes down to it, those nights in the courtyard – the long, late nights spent drinking an ocean of alcoholic beverages, chatting with friends and eating saugies – are truly where the warm, beating heart of NECON becomes most alive. The friendly, even affectionate atmosphere of the whole event is truly something special.

Photo by N. Conley.

Photo by N. Conley.

Special. That’s what NECON is, really — special.

And this, right here – right when I’m beginning to really, really enjoy reminiscing about what an amazing time NECON 33 was – is where I’m going to cut myself off, before I go into the aforementioned novel length territory. I’m already sailing ahead at almost 2,000 words, so I’d say it’s time to call it a night.

But in all seriousness, I just want to thank everyone who organized, contributed and attended NECON this year for creating an absolutely extraordinary event, one which even a “NECON newbie” like myself will never forget. Necon doesn’t just live up the hype, it surpasses it. There’s no other con like it, and I guarantee that I’m going to make a point to come back.

Pictures from Rock and Shock 2012, Part 1

Author Trisha Wooldridge talking with author Jack Ketchum. Photo by Jason Harris.

From left to right: NEHW Co-chair Tracy Carbone, actor Sean Whalen, and NEHW Co-chair Stacey Longo. Photo by Jason Harris.

Actor Sean Whalen and NEHW Director of Publicity Jason Harris. Photo by Stacey Longo.

The Women of Horror panel: (from left to right) actress Heather Langenkamp, author Tracy Carbone, author Stacey Longo, author Trisha Wooldridge, and actress Lisa Marie. Photo by Jason Harris.

The Women of Horror panel: (from left to right) actress Heather Langenkamp, author Tracy Carbone, author Stacey Longo, author Trisha Wooldridge, and actress Lisa Marie. Photo by Jason Harris.

The Women of Horror after the panel. Photo by Jason Harris.

Author Kristi Petersen Schoonover helps fellow author Trisha Wooldridge with her corset for Rock and Shock. Photo by Jason Harris.

Author Bracken MacLeod is so excited to be at Rock and Shock; his left hand can’t stop moving. Photo by Jason Harris.

Author Jack Haringa. Photo by Jason Harris.

From left to right: NEHW members Stacey Longo, K. Allen Wood, and Sarah Gomes. Photo by Jason Harris.

Authors Adam Cesare (holding a box of books) and Scott Goudsward. Photo by Jason Harris.

Authors Rob Watts and Kristi Petersen Schoonover talking at Rock and Shock. Photo by Jason Harris.

Candyman actor Tony Todd. Photo by Jason Harris.

Brian Anderson, of Waltham, MA., as zombie stormtrooper and Ghostbuster Travis Smith, of Providence, RI. Photo by Jason Harris.

Author Rob Watts talking with author Stacey Longo in the NEHW booth at Rock and Shock. Photo by Jason Harris.

The other table in the NEHW booth. Photo by Jason Harris.

Author Kristi Petersen Schoonover talks to Dr. Chris. Photo by Jason Harris.

Author Stacey Longo. Photo by Jason Harris.

Celebrities Coming to Rock and Shock

Celebrities Coming to Rock and Shock

by Jason Harris

Rock and Shock is lining up the celebrities for this year’s convention and it seems a new one is added every day. In the last two days, Heather Langenkamp (Nightmare on Elm Street)and Danny Trejo (From Dusk till Dawn, Machete) were added to the line-up. They join Doug Bradley, who portrayed Pinhead in eight Hellraiser movies and Lylesberg in Nightbreed, Sig Haig and Bill Moseley, who both appeared in House of 1000 Corpses and The Devil Rejects, Brian o’Halloran who portrayed Dante Hicks in the two Clerks movies and Anthony Michael Hall (The Dark Knight), who has been in the John Hughes’ classics The Breakfast Club and Weird Science and in The Dead Zone television series. These are just a few of the celebrities appearing at Rock and Shock.

If you are not into the movie celebs, there are also a star of the written word appearing at the convention. Author Jack Ketchum will once again bring his talent to Worcester. The writer of such novels as Red, Offspring, The Woman and The Girl Next Door, which all have been made into movies.

Wrestling star turned actor Diamond Dallas Page (The Devil’s Rejects) will be at Rock and Shock too.

It seems like the organizers of Rock and Shock can’t get enough of the music group, Kiss. They invited Ace Frehley, former lead guitarist of KISS, to last year’s convention. This year Peter Criss, the former drummer of the band, will be on hand signing autographs.

For a list of the other guests appearing at Rock and Shock, click here.

Rock and Shock takes place at the DCU Center, located at 40 Foster St., in Worcester, MA.

Three Reasons to Attend Necon

Three Reasons to Attend Necon

by Jason Harris

I have been going to the Northeastern Writers’ Conference (Necon) for over 13 years. I can’t believe it’s been over a decade since my first one. Since I started going in the late 90s, I haven’t missed a year. I have been going to this convention longer than I have known my wife, who I have gotten hooked on Necon as well. It’s funny that it took a friend from Florida to introduced me to Necon since this convention is based in New England; a place I have lived my entire life.

1. The first reason to become a Necon camper is to meet fellow writers or fellow readers if you are not a writer. Here are a few writers that have attended the convention in the past: Stephen King, F. Paul Wilson, Peter Straub, Rick Hautala, Christopher Golden, Neil Gaiman, Craig Shaw Gardner, Tracy L. Carbone, Stacey Longo, Dan Keohane, Wraith James White, Brian Keene, Simon Clark, James A. Moore, Weston Ochse, and Jack Ketchum.

2. The second reason is to learn about the publishing industry and upcoming trends. Every Necon, there are always panels with varying topics such as e-books, young adult horror, trends in horror, vampires, zombies, and movies to name a few that have been held at this convention. The e-book topic is fitting since Necon E-Books was announced at Necon 30. Check out the selection of e-books here.

3. The third reason is to pick up more books and have the authors sign it. On Friday night during Necon, there is a “Meet the Authors” event. This is the time where you can get books that you brought signed. Or you can buy a book direct from the author. There is no better way to potentially meet the next Stephen King. And when they do become famous, you can tell your friends that you met and talked with the author at Necon. Your friends will be very jealous.

The NEHW table at Necon’s Authors’ Night. Photo by Jason Harris.

There are more reasons to attend Necon, but the main three are found above. Once you attend, you will find out the other reasons why this convention is so great. When you decide to go, just write on the registration form that Jason Harris referred you. You won’t regret it.

Necon happens in Rhode Island every July. For more information, click here.

Hanging Out with Horror Writers

Since there has been a number of entries this week with pictures from Necon, I thought it would be nice to read an author’s blog entry written while they attended Necon 32. Author and Co-Chair of the NEHW Stacey Longo wrote such a blog. Author Jeff Strand (Pressure) even stopped by and commented on her blog.

Please enjoy this author’s current blog entry.

Hanging Out with Horror Writers

by Stacey Longo

I’m writing this in my hotel room at NECON, the Northeastern Writers’ Conference. I have to admit, it can be a little intimidating walking in to a conference center filled with some of the sickest, most twisted minds that horror has to offer, but I like to come prepared. Before I come to one of these events, I write up a list of fun topics and conversation starters in case I find myself face-to-face with F. Paul Wilson and can’t interest him in the pictures of the time I met Duran Duran. Here was my list for this year:
1. Brush up on your serial killers. Many writers base their novels on real-life events, and find this subject fascinating. I found myself on the first day sitting next to Dallas Mayr (Jack Ketchum) and was able to successfully entertain him with tales of a serial cannibal I once knew. These kinds of sure-fire conversation starters are key to any horror convention.
2. Pick a side: Lovecraft or Poe? You just can’t be ambivalent about this topic. If you’re going to go to a convention of writers, you’d better love one and hate the other, and be able to defend your side vehemently. Otherwise, Darryl Schweitzer will peg you as an imposter faster than you can say “Cthulhu.”
3. Watch as many obscure scary movies as possible before attending. The only thing horror writers like more than a creepy story is a scary movie. There also seems to be a tendency among this group to find the most ambiguous film ever made and make you feel like a giant lump of stupid if you haven’t seen it. Heard today over lunch: “You haven’t seen When Hell Comes to Frog Town? It’s only Rowdy Roddy Piper’s best cinematic performance of his career. I’m sorry, I can no longer continue speaking to you, you giant lump of stupid.”
4. Be prepared to have your favorite Stephen King novel completely skewered. Another popular activity for horror writers: espousing on why Stephen King is a hack. You thought The Stand was fabulous? Blind meadow voles could sniff out a better novel. Did you find Bag of Bones entertaining? You are an incompetent boor who should be eaten alive by blind meadow voles. Why on earth would you be so foolish to think that the most popular author on the planet could actually write a good story? (I suspect this is such a favorite activity among horror writers because they might be a tad jealous. However, this has not prevented me from trashing Under the Dome in select circles.) There you have it: a primer on blending in among horror’s literary elite. I would write some more tips, but I am currently being dragged outside and tied to a stake so that I can be eaten alive by blind meadow voles.

Moments after admitting that I kind of liked Stephen King’s Insomnia, I realize I’m a dead woman.